Questions about BAHA (bone conduction HA's)

jscott

New Member
I just tried several in-office BAHA's. My right ear hearing loss is caused by poor conduction through the middle ear. The BAHA's significantly improved the volume of sound and my own voice sounded quite different. The devices also allow me to hear bass sounds better. However I took my classical guitar in to see how that would sound and the results were mixed. Some of this had to do with the acoustics in the room and possibly the novelty of hearing differently. And the lack of programming. But I wonder if the microphones in these aids are as good as in traditional aids AND if the bone conduction method is as fine and subtle as with traditional aids? Any insight or info would be much appreciated.

--Jeff
 

Cris

New Member
You should definitely have them programmed to address your specific hearing profile, even if it's a trial. It will dramatically improve the quality of sounds you hear, and give you a clearer idea of what to expect, post-op. Many users report that BAHAs sound more natural than their traditional hearing aids did. As with all things, you get what you pay for, so don't cheap out and buy the lowest quality, especially if you are a musician. There will be a significant difference in technology and sound quality that correlates with price.

Surgery is usually very safe. Only a tiny percentage have complications, usually unrelated to the implant itself. You'll experience far fewer issues than you did with HAs, such as ear irritation, skin irritation, ear infections, etc. If you have sufficient hair to cover the device, it'll be easier to hide, if appearances are an issue for you. One last tip: a small percentage of users experience pain when using BAHAs over time. It's way less common with modern techniques and equipment, but it can still happen, so know that going in. One last thing: I'm not a doctor, so take this all with a large grain of salt.
 
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